Opel Grandland Hybrid4 300 PHEV: what is the most expensive and powerful Grandland worth?

AND BREF

Restyled version of the Grandland X

Plug-in hybrid

300 hp, 520 Nm, 0 to 100 km/h in 6.1 s.

59 km of WLTP autonomy in 100% electric

Unique Ultimate finish at €55,400

The Opel Grandland X, presented in 2017, already adopted the technical undersides (platform, engines, boxes) of the Peugeot 3008, even before PSA bought Opel from General Motors. Identical technique, but very different style, not to say opposite. The Grandland X contrasted the modernity of its Sochaux cousin with a discreet classicism, but not unpleasant for part of the clientele of this segment of compact SUVs, which was more conservative.

By becoming Grandland, this Opel retains a classic positioning, but the restyling gives it a whole new front end, sporting the “Vizor” grille, inaugurated by the Mokka, and now the brand’s stylistic signature. It also brings him a completely redesigned dashboard, which is not so common during mid-career touch-ups.

L'Opel Grandland
The Opel Grandland “X” before its restyling.
After restyling, here is the
After restyling, here is the “Grandland”. He has changed a lot.

A face that adopts the new Opel styling identity

Thus we find a bow transfigured by the adoption of this new grille. Very vertical, it sports a black panel with in its extension, the LED optics, here matrix, the whole being framed by a chrome border, giving the impression that the whole thing forms a single block. The shield has also been extensively revised, with an aluminum-coloured insert and vertical vents which direct the airflow towards the wheels.

This completely transforms the appearance of the Grandland, and fits it perfectly into the new identity of the range.

At the rear, the changes were much more discreet, with only the appearance of the “Grandland” lettering on the tailgate. And there is always the possibility of adopting a black contrasting roof, as standard on this version.

At the front, everything changes: grille
At the front, everything changes: “Vizor” grille, optics, shield. This is the brand’s new stylistic identity.
At the rear on the contrary, almost no modification, apart from the Grandland lettering which appears on the tailgate.
At the rear on the contrary, almost no modification, apart from the Grandland lettering which appears on the tailgate.

A completely revised dashboard

And in the passenger compartment, a highlight for a restyling, the dashboard has been completely redesigned. It remains less modern than that of the cousin 3008 but appears more up to date than that of other competitors on the market. It actually adopts the concept seen in the little brother Mokka, again dubbed “Pure panel”. These are two digital screens embedded in the same black lacquered panel. In front of the driver, a configurable 12-inch screen displays driving information and driving aids. And as an extension, there is the 10-inch multimedia screen. The latter still uses the old PSA system, which is now dated in its graphics. Less efficient than the new Stellantis system or what is done at Renault or Volkswagen, it still works very honestly, although a bit slowly, and is compatible with Apple Car Play and Android Auto.

In the passenger compartment, the dashboard has been reviewed from A to Z. It adopts the concept of
Inside, the dashboard has been revised from A to Z. It adopts the “Pure panel” concept seen on the Mokka. Two digital screens combined in the same black lacquered frame. It’s more modern than before. The finish and ergonomics are successful.

In any case, the ergonomics are good, Opel having decided to keep, for example, separate physical controls for the air conditioning. And the quality of the materials does not have to be ashamed of the comparison compared to the generalist competition, as it was already the case before restyling.

Life on board also remains pleasant, with plenty of storage, decent roominess in the rear (but no sliding bench seat here, because of the hybrid system batteries), and a boot volume of 390 litres, also reduced by the batteries (514 liters for thermal models). Seat folded down, the 1,528 liters are on the other hand a good figure. And there are small compartments under the floor of the trunk to store the charging cables, it’s always good to take.

The legroom is correct, but the seat, because of the hybrid batteries, is not sliding.
The legroom is correct, but the seat, because of the hybrid batteries, is not sliding.
The trunk has 390 liters of bench seat volume in place, that's 124 liters less than the thermal models.  Bench folded down, it's 1,528 liters.
The trunk has 390 liters of bench seat volume in place, that’s 124 liters less than the thermal models. Bench folded down, it’s 1,528 liters.

59 km of theoretical autonomy in 100% electric

The restyled Grandland also keeps the same mechanics as before, including this advanced plug-in hybrid system. In this most advanced configuration, the power unit, based on a 200 hp 1.6 Puretech, aided by two electric motors (110 hp at the front and 113 hp at the rear), which makes it the only 4-wheel drive version, develops 300 cumulative hp and 520 Nm of torque. It is officially announced at 1.3 liters per 100 km and 29 to 30 grams of CO2 per km. It is mated to the e-EAT8 box, like all Stellantis plug-in hybrids.

The Grandland still offers the plug-in hybrid block pushed to 300 hp and 520 Nm. It uses the 1.6 Puretech in 200 hp, and two electric motors, one at the front between engine and gearbox (110 hp), and another on the rear axle (113 hp).  Which makes it the only 4x4 in the range.
The Grandland still offers the plug-in hybrid block pushed to 300 hp and 520 Nm. It uses the 1.6 Puretech in 200 hp, and two electric motors, one at the front between engine and gearbox (110 hp), and another on the rear axle (113 hp). Which makes it the only 4×4 in the range.

Its performance is solid, with a top speed of 235 km/h and a 0 to 100 shot in 6.1 seconds. Exactly like the old model. Similarly, the 13.2 kWh hybrid battery, whose capacity has not changed, still allows 59 km of autonomy in 100% electric, according to the WLTP cycle. It’s not phenomenal, but the 3008, and for good reason because it has the same mechanics, doesn’t do better. Only the Toyota Rav-4, if we stay in the general brands, does better, with 75 km of autonomy in 100% electric, thanks to a larger battery of 18.1 kWh.

As standard, the Grandland has a charger of only 3.7 kW, which can recharge in about 4 hours on a reinforced socket and 7 hours on a household socket. As an option (€400), you can choose a 7.4 kW/32A charger, which reduces the charging time to 1h50 on a suitable terminal (most public terminals 11 or 22 kW).

A little less actually…

No change in any case at this level, and no change at all when you take the wheel of this model.

Let’s get rid of the subject of consumption right away. In 100% electric mode, we covered 44 kilometres. A figure that could have been a little higher if we had not taken a section of the 110 motorway on our route. But it still seems complicated to reach the theoretical 59 km.

In hybrid mode, full battery, we saw a consumption of 4.2 liters on average, and a battery that lasted almost double the time (82 km). Battery empty, consumption climbs, and we found a still satisfactory 6.1 liters, without however having taken the highway at 130 km / h. In forced battery charge mode, consumption soars to more than 10 litres. It is absolutely necessary to avoid this mode, unless you absolutely have to drive in 100% electric at your destination.

The performance of this vitamin-packed Grandland is consistent with power as long as the battery is sufficiently charged. The accelerations are tonic, the times very consistent, despite a ballasted weight of 360 kg because of the hybrid system. On the other hand, as soon as the batteries are really empty, we end up with a hundred horsepower less, and the 1.6 Puretech gives a lot more voice, because it has to get power and performance much higher in the revs. Hence the interest, in normal use, to recharge as often as possible, both for consumption, performance, but also noise.

A good compromise between comfort and dynamism

The chassis is faithful to what it was, that is to say a very good compromise between dynamism and comfort. It is certainly firm, much more than a Citroën C5 Aircross or the Korean models, but a little less than a 3008, and never uncomfortable. Motor skills are never faulted, especially in 4×4 mode (which also works in 100% electric mode). Of course, in very dynamic driving, at the limit, the Grandland turns out to be unsurprisingly understeer, which is a good thing for the average driver, because it is easy to control.

On the road, the 300 hp Grandland Hybrid4 is efficient (when its battery is full), quiet, and offers a good compromise between comfort and dynamism.  It is a pleasure to drive behind the wheel.
On the road, the 300 hp Grandland Hybrid4 is efficient (when its battery is full), quiet, and offers a good compromise between comfort and dynamism. It is a pleasure to drive behind the wheel.

The steering is pleasant, not overly assisted and quite communicative, and the braking is very well managed here, switching smoothly from regenerative braking to hydraulic braking. Well done Opel. Overall, the Grandland is nicer with the wheel than a C5 Aircross, or a Volkswagen Tiguan, more dynamic than the Korean competitors, and not that far from the 3008, which is still a little more dynamic, but only slightly , and owes it mainly to the feeling due to its small steering wheel.

Complete equipment, fortunately given the price

Let’s finish with the equipment. As much to say it right away, it is more than complete. And for good reason, the Grandland equipped with this engine only exists in a single “Ultimate” finish, the most upscale. Complete yes, but extremely expensive. Indeed, after an increase of €900 on September 1, it appears at €55,400, which is starting to sting severely. Especially since above €50,000, plug-in hybrid models are no longer eligible for the €1,000 bonus.

The equipment is ultra-complete.  Fortunately, given the high price of €55,400!
The equipment is ultra-complete. Fortunately, given the high price of €55,400!

For this price, however, the staffing is complete (see also equipment page), with level 2 autonomous driving, matrix LED lights, connected navigation, 18-inch rims, electric, heated and ventilated front seats, heated steering wheel, windshield heated, smartphone induction charging, 360° camera, active parking assistance, blind spot vehicle alerts, lane departure warning, black contrast roof, roof bars, etc.

The only options are leather upholstery (€990), night vision system (€1,000), motorized tailgate (€290) and 19-inch rims (€540).